BRCA Facts

Everyone has a BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene.

  • There are a few thousand mutations on BRCA1 and BRCA2.
  • When I tested positive, my doctor and genetic counselor told me that my risk was up to an 87% chance of getting breast cancer and up to a 60% chance of getting ovarian cancer by the age of 70.  These numbers will vary depending on who interprets your test results.
  • We’re learning about other cancer risk genes.   Other cancer risk genes have many variations of uncertain significance.  These genes include:
    • AKT1, APC, ATM, ATR, BAP1, BARD1, BMPR1A, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, CDH1, CDK4, CDKN2A, CHEK1, CHEK2, CTNNA1, FAM175A (Abraxas), GALNT12, GEN1, GREM1, HOXB13, MEN1, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2 (+EPCAM), MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PIK3CA, PPM1D, PMS2, POLD1, POLE, PRSS1, PTEN, RAD50, RAD51, RAD51C, RAD51D, RET, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SMAD4, STK11, TP53, TP53BP1, VHL, and XRCC2
  • Men can also carry BRCA mutations – and they also have an increased risk of cancer.
  • Current USPSTF guidelines of health coverage services for BRCA, women who have already been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer (without family history) do not qualify for preventative services because their care is no longer considered ‘preventative.’
  • It is estimated nearly 1 million people in the United states carry a BRCA mutation.  Only 10% of people who carry an BRCA mutation actually know it.  
  •  Know your breast density.  The ability of mammography to detect a cancer is 80% among women with predominantly fatty breasts but just 30% in women with highly dense breasts.  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1088055

Resources:

http://onlinecasino-games.com/online-bingo/
%d bloggers like this: